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December 11, 2019
MadeKnown scores another win at the Summit International Creative Awards

MadeKnown scores another win at the Summit International Creative Awards

MadeKnown is again grateful to have been acknowledged with a Bronze Award for our design and development of the Catholic Diocese of Rockhampton website at the 2019 Summit International Creative Awards (SIA) held in Portland Oregon USA. The SIA is the oldest and most prestigious organisation that administers an advertising award exclusively for firms with […]

MadeKnown is again grateful to have been acknowledged with a Bronze Award for our design and development of the Catholic Diocese of Rockhampton website at the 2019 Summit International Creative Awards (SIA) held in Portland Oregon USA.

The SIA is the oldest and most prestigious organisation that administers an advertising award exclusively for firms with billings under $30 million.

 

The SIA is the oldest and most prestigious organisation that administers an advertising award exclusively for firms with billings under $30 million.

Throughout their twenty-five year history, the Creative Award is established as one of the premier indicators of creative and communication excellence. Using stringent evaluation criteria and a blind judging processes, their competitions reward only those firms whose work exemplifies the best in its class.

This now marks MadeKnown’s eighth year in business with eight awards, having previously won awards from both the Summit International Awards and also the Queensland MultiMedia Awards, all for work produced with our regional clients.

MadeKnown was borne from a desire to bring all our knowledge, skills and experience together in one point and time. These awards again highlight the standard of work on offer to businesses outside of the southern capitals.

We share this new award proudly with the entire team involved at the Catholic Diocese of Rockhampton offices. We truly believe that small teams working very closely together achieve the best, most successful work. Our approach is designed to facilitate that and ensure quality, logistics and superlative attention to detail are all met.

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September 29, 2019

Meet the man who dreams up some of the world’s biggest brand names

Shaved with a Mach3 razor? Played Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare? Flown with the One World alliance? If so, you’ve used a product named by Jonathan Bell, a British branding guru who has dreamt up some of the world’s most well-known and successful trademarks. But, he warned in a recent podcast not only is plucking […]

Shaved with a Mach3 razor? Played Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare? Flown with the One World alliance?

If so, you’ve used a product named by Jonathan Bell, a British branding guru who has dreamt up some of the world’s most well-known and successful trademarks.

But, he warned in a recent podcast not only is plucking names from thin air that customers will fall in love with an incredibly tricky task, it can also be deadly. In the 1990s a mix up between two similarly named drugs, not named by Mr Bell, led to patients being prescribed the wrong one — leading to fatal results.

Mr Bell, who runs US based agency Want Branding was talking last week on Freakonomics Radio’s Tell Me Something I Don’t Know podcast created by Stephen J. Dubner, author of the Freakonomics books.

Mr Bell has helped name US mobile phone giants Cingular and Verizon as well as internet radio company SiriusXM.

Australia’s own Hungry Jack’s is named after a US pastry brand after the fast food giant Burger King found it couldn’t use its own name in Australia as it had already been trademarked.

Asked how many potential brand names end up on the cutting room floor, due to legal and other issues, he said it was the vast majority.

“It’s about 95 per cent, it is a very high percentage failure rate, [you’ve] got so many names out there that have trademark issues and [pre-existing] URLs.

“There’s something like 170,000 words in an English dictionary and something like 300 million companies, so do the maths.”

Brand names, he said, fell into just a few categories.

The first is the name of founders, such as Disney and Tesla, although the latter is named in homage to Serbian electrical engineer Nikola Tesla, who died in 1943.

Then there are descriptive names, like American Airlines, and initials, like BP, British Petroleum, which are essentially the same.

Some names are descriptive in another language, like Lego which is close in sound to the Danish phrase “leg godt” which in English means “play well”.

Sirius is an associative name, the brightest star in the sky, the owners hope that gives the brand some extra sparkle.

While ‘suggestive’ names turn real words into brands. “Uber literally means outstanding, so it works well for a company with big bold ambitions,” Mr Bell said in a 2016 TED talk.

Then, finally, there are purely abstract names, like Rolex.

Mr Bell says his teams can spend around eight weeks concocting a new brand. First they decided what category of name they want and then research and brainstorm before presenting 10-15 possibilities to clients.

Part of the process involves ensuring a name works in other languages.

“Mach3 had to be tested and researched to death because we knew different countries would pronounce it differently. In Mexico, it’s ‘Mach tres’. In Germany, it’s ‘Mach drei’,” he told the New York Post.

“There have been examples of companies embarrassing themselves by launching products with inappropriate meanings overseas.”

Brand names for individual products are easier to create than names for entire companies, he told the Freakonomics podcast.

“Products get named much further down the management ranks. But with a (company name) everyone can be aligned on a final name and then we walk into the CEO’s office and he’s like, ‘I don’t like it, what else have you got?’ and you’re back to square one.”

A recent global rebranding was that of US luxury goods maker Coach. While it kept the Coach brand for its consumer facing accessories business, the company behind it is now called Tapestry.

The firm said the new name, embodies the “values of being optimistic, innovative and inclusive”. But the name, solidly in Mr Bell’s suggestive category, also brings to mind the craftsmanship and materials that go into creating a tapestry.

“The best brands don’t describe what they do or who created them, they stand for a big idea that translates into emotional appeal — Nike is about winning, Go Pro about heroism.”

You also don’t want a brand name that sounds too similar to another product.

That could mean someone picks up a competitor’s product by mistake. But in one instance, it has even proved deadly, said Mr Bell.

“Pharmaceutical naming is very complex because not only do you have to surpass the hurdle of trademarks, the FDA (the US’ Food and Drugs Administration) needs to approve final brand names and the reason is people can die if they’re given the wrong prescription drug.”

“There was a situation in the early ‘90s where there were two drugs on the market — Losec and Lasix — and some one died because they got the wrong drugs, so the FDA forced Losec to change its name to Prilosec,” he said.

The drugs themselves were fine if prescribed correctly.

According to thePhiladelphia Inquirer, “a patient who suffered a bleeding ulcer got Lasix, a diuretic or ‘water pill’ and bled to death. A heart patient who needed Lasix to treat fluid retention got the ulcer drug and died from a worsening of their congestive heart failure.”

That’s why, said Mr Bell, with pharmaceutical drugs, “you see these really crazy weird names”.

His favourite products to name were vehicles — both those that operate on roads and the waves.

“Cars are pretty cool to name and we’ve just named seven cruise ships for Royal Caribbean and Celebrity Cruises.

“We worked for two years and we named ‘Quantum’, ‘Anthem’ and ‘Ovation’ and another ship called ‘Harmony’, that’s the biggest thing I’ve named.”

Mr Bell said he wasn’t fazed by some auto groups eschewing individual car names, like the Ford Falcon, for simple numbers, like the Audi A3 for instance.

“That puts the emphasis back on Audi. When you’re Ford and you’ve got Explorer and a dozen other different names — that takes away from the Ford name and means you have to build equity in those different brands.”

One of the brands he wished he named was energy drink Red Bull which, he said, sounded “powerful” and had a “notion of energy”.

But he admits to also loving one of the most derided new brands. In 2015, Google Inc became Alphabet, leaving the famous name purely for its internet products.

“Is Alphabet a great name? You bet,” Mr Bell said in his TED talk.

“The name is an idea, it’s a set of letters that forms the basis of all communications. The name encourages Wall Street investors to buy this stock as you’re making an ‘alpha bet’ — one that will outperform others — and lastly, it’s a real dictionary word, which is rare find these days.”

Story is taken from news.com.au. Benedict Brook. November 23, 2017
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August 25, 2019
A quick brand analogy

A quick brand analogy

We get asked quite a bit at MadeKnown what a brand is, and invariably we describe it the same way; a brand is formed from a relationship. This more often than not is somewhat difficult for people to understand, eliciting comments such as “but my brand is my product or business?” or “my brand is […]

We get asked quite a bit at MadeKnown what a brand is, and invariably we describe it the same way; a brand is formed from a relationship.

This more often than not is somewhat difficult for people to understand, eliciting comments such as “but my brand is my product or business?” or “my brand is my logo”. To which we answer, no and hell no respectively.

If someone tells you they ‘do branding’ and then proceed to show you loads of logos, politely excuse yourself and then simply exit the building.

A brand is formed, moulded and ever changing through the interactions and relationships it has with its customers. An easy way towards understanding this completely is to describe it with an analogy.

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“A brand is like a person, or more rightly a friendship between people.”

You’ll likely agree that your idea or perception about who someone is, is formed from experience and affected and changed over time.

For example, you may form an opinion about someone when you first meet them. By how they look, their hair, their makeup, their style of clothes, their mannerisms, their physique, the car they drive and the music they listen to. This is their logo, a representation of who they believe they are and how they would like to be perceived. This image in itself has been formed, influenced and changed over time.

If you get a bad haircut or choose a new style of clothes, your friends soon let you know if it is right or wrong for you (or for who they believe you to be) and you may then make changes based on their opinions.

With this, we get closer to what a brand is.

You are obviously not only the sum of the clothes you wear, your haircut or your car… well, hopefully not anyway. Our perception of someone also comes from their personality, the things they do, they way they act, their culture, their values and beliefs, their morals and standards. From how they help old people to cross the street or to how they may steal candy from babies.

You can be the best of friends with someone and then one day they do something bad or wrong, and your perception of them changes. If they value your friendship they may take steps to redeem themselves, working to change your opinion of them.

Friendships are formed and made stronger or weaker through shared experiences, this works exactly the same for brands.  Which leads us to something very powerful.

A company can rarely dictate what their brand is, they can only influence it. Just as someone telling you they are your friend does not necessarily make it so, they need to earn the right, a brand needs to work to become positive in its consumer’s mind.

If someone is seen as being a good person it is usually because they have actually done good things, rather than simply by saying they have.

Like one of your friends, a brand is a perception you form about a business or product over time, purely from personal experience. This perception can ultimately only be changed through actions.

Although using how we develop friends is a great way to illustrate how brands develop, the role of people in actual brands is also incredibly strong.

To describe this simply, how many times have you been served in a store by a grumpy or non-helpful worker and thought, “I won’t shop here again”?

This is branding.

Trent Siddharta
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August 19, 2019
Understanding your audience

Understanding your audience

One of the first ports of call for any enterprise starting on the road to uncover their brand is to gain a thorough understanding of their target customers. Understanding your target customers is a critical step in determining your brand relationships and the conversations you have. Realistically, if you don’t know who you’re talking to […]

One of the first ports of call for any enterprise starting on the road to uncover their brand is to gain a thorough understanding of their target customers. Understanding your target customers is a critical step in determining your brand relationships and the conversations you have. Realistically, if you don’t know who you’re talking to it’s pretty hard sometimes knowing what to say.

‘Branding aside, understanding your target customers is also one of the most important points in any business plan as it helps to determine the right fit for your products or service.”

A great, and obvious, place to start in discovering your audience demographic is to gain an understanding of the generations and their lifestyles over the past 100 years or so. There are often many subsets to every target audience and the categories and boundaries of these and the generations continually blur and change, but it is still a great place to start and will help in gaining a basic understanding which can be further distilled down through more precise analytics.

Gen I

Also tagged as Gen Z, Alpha, the internet generation or iGen they’re the offspring of the youngest boomers. As this generation are still quite young theories and demographics for them are still under construction. What we do know is that this is the first generation born entirely into the internet era, and to parents who have already accepted and are immersed in technology. It is projected that Gen I will be the most formally educated with one in every two gaining a university degree.

Gen Y

Also known as Echo Boomer and Millennials they are the children of the Boomers, born around 1980-2000. Having grown up with computers this generation can be very responsive to internet campaigns, they process, mark and tag information quickly and can be especially loyal to brands and labels. They like things that are a bit quirky or left of centre and appreciate marketing that is innovative and humourous. Because of high costs of living they can often be found living at home or if not, still have parental support so usually have disposable income.

Gen X

Born between the early 60’s to the early 80’s, we also like to refer to them as ‘Friends’ (not our actual friends but the TV show Friends). An extremely large generation with many subcultures they are tech-smart, love to shop and can often be found sipping coffee and reading self-help books. They are now entering their peak earning and buying years but also like to save. Generally cynical, brands alone won’t sway this generation, they also need to know your product or service is good quality and value.

Boomers

Born after World War II and named basically because of the boom in births that occurred up until the 60’s. They are a massive generation in numbers and are now at many life stages: empty or full nesters, boomer grandparents, single, married, divorced etc. They are idealistic, driven and uncynical and the first generation who travelled on mass abroad for holidays and not to fight in a war. They evaluate advertising easily to determine its value and although are ageing still love life so youthfulness in marketing campaigns can be useful.

The Greatest Generation

A more American term (all of the early ones are really) this is the generation that grew up through the Great Depression, World War II and many great economic hardships. They were born between 1909-1945. They have obviously seen it all, over and over, when it comes to advertising so are a very smart consumer segment. They are the most careful and considering generation who want to know more about a business before they connect and buy. Just because they’re the oldest generation doesn’t mean they don’t use the internet though, usually with loads of grandchildren to buy presents for they are large contributors in the online shopping juggernaut. As they usually have pensions to rely on promoting the value in your products or services can be beneficial and as they are practical can be very loyal customers.

If your business audience is generation specific it will obviously be important to find out much more information than the above to help you in your brand, marketing or product development. Further research can then build on this through understanding areas such as target subcultures, location, income and purchasing power, family status and work and leisure activities.

Like to know more? General but detailed information is freely available from Census on population and housing from the Australian Bureau of Statistics http://www.abs.gov.au/census. Other than that, a little thing called the internet may be of use.

Trent Siddharta

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